Green-screen Matchmove Test (100% opacity of geometry)

This is a shot on a chromakey stage we did for a test in MFA grad courses, so we could track the markers and accurately place something in 3D space. I know there's a fraction of a second where it appears to "slip," but this clip was shot with a Canon 7D, and the infamous "rolling shutter jell-o" effect is present. I did not remove the jello-vision, it was not part of this assignment. Had this been a production shot, yes, we would have interpolated the frames to prevent skewing. I know it looks funky/silly/stupid, but in the compositing stage, the actor would be rotoscoped/keyed here. Seeing as how that's much further down the work pipeline, it looks like the block is "covering" or overlapping him; but it's not "off," it is accurate. The checkerboard texture is to ensure the matchmove isn't slipping and sliding all over the place. Now just how accurate do we have to be? We must be accurate LITERALLY down to 1 pixel! Anything less, and they eye will pick it up when it's blown up HUGE onto a screen. However, the software is sophisticated enough to track down to 1/64 of a pixel! Without matchmoving, EVERY time there was a visual effects shot, the camera would never be allowed to move, otherwise one would see the matte lines. Now we can move the camera however we want, and it adds that much more to selling the illusion that whatever is placed into the shot, really "looks like it's there." A good example of a nearly ALL matchmove feature would be "Cloverfield." All hand-held shaky camera shots! In this case, my instructor was the man who LITERALLY wrote the book on the subject, Mr. Tim Dobbert (very nice guy, helpful, cool, great teacher): http://www.amazon.com/o/asin/0782144039/mockerybird/ref=nosim You can see his amazing resume on IMDB: http://www.imdb.com/name/nm1657296/ If you would like to consider 3D Camera Matchmoving as part of your filming workflow, be sure to contact a VFX Supervisor or Producer. Just because you can imitate in your garage what you see on the "Behind the Scenes" cuts on DVD and Blu-Ray, or online, does not make you a skilled VFX technician. There is a wealth of knowledge both up and down the pipeline that benefit from having someone skilled in this regard oversee shooting on that/those day/s.

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